Journal of Scientific Papers

ECONOMICS & SOCIOLOGY


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ISSN 2071-789X

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Can internet in schools and technology adoption stimulate productivity in emerging markets?

Vol. 13, No 1, 2020

Domicián Máté

 

University of Debrecen, 

Faculty of Engineering, Hungary

E-mail: mate.domician@eng.unideb.hu

ORCID 0000-0002-4995-7650

Can internet in schools and technology adoption stimulate productivity in emerging markets?

 

Edina Erdei

 

Ihrig Károly Doctoral School, 

University of Debrecen, Hungary

E-mail: edina.erdei@econ.unideb.hu


Vahid Zeynvand Lorestani

 

Ihrig Károly Doctoral School, 

University of Debrecen, Hungary

E-mail: vahid.zeynvand@econ.unideb.hu


József Popp

 

Szent István University,

Faculty of Economics and Social Sciences, Gödöllő, Hungary;

North-West University, TRADE Research Entity, South Africa

E-mail: popp.jozsef@econ.unideb.hu

ORCID 0000-0003-0848-4591


Judit Oláh

 

University of Debrecen, Faculty of Economics and Business, Hungary;

North-West University, TRADE Research Entity, South Africa

E-mail: olah.judit@econ.unideb.hu

ORCID 0000-0003-2247-1711

 


 

Abstract. This study investigates whether access to the Internet in schools and the share of its users stimulate productivity development in emerging markets in the period from 2007 to 2016. Following the rise of new endogenous theories, the opposition appeared in the empirical approaches related to the role of ICTs. The analysis is based on distinctive variables and various competitiveness pillars from the datasets published by the World Bank and the World Economic Forum. The empirical findings from the dynamic (GMM) regressions affirm that the interaction to the Internet access in schools, fixed broadband penetration and the latest available technologies affect productivity growth. However, mobile broadband subscription is negatively related to productivity. Hence, the support of competitiveness goals through larger access to the Internet in education, the improved fixed Internet broadband and the absorption of new technologies can make emerging markets more competitive and sustain productivity growth in the long run.

 

Received: April, 2019

1st Revision: December, 2019

Accepted: February, 2020

 

DOI: 10.14254/2071-789X.2020/13-1/12

JEL ClassificationD02, O17, P31

Keywords: ICTs adoption, productivity growth, panel regression, Internet access, emerging markets